Click to view the piece on VIMEO

Click to view the piece on VIMEO

CPR FADE is an improvisation that became a basis for this piece "line line line". Play both videos at the same time - play them against each other, at varying start points, with different sounds. Enjoying the cut out shapes and fading light. 

 

Writing #1

separated maps evolving into moments of matching and synchronizing. the same- the different- the differentiated. the way that two bodies can be tracing different maps- maps being a known pattern,  a known trajectory, a known traceable future.  and then branch off into two separated cerebral states- but existing in the same time and shape. 

2 different studios and 2 different pieces. each space defining its product as something unique and without measure…..

a figuring out of what is- once you have decided to create out of nothing- once you have brought into existence SOMETHING. THEN you can begin to look at the object of that something- at the similarities, at the nature of the space of it, at the nature of the negative of it. 

 

Writing #2

CPR- large studio- finds itself being something strange, cutout,  finds itself quirky and weird and completely presentational without actually trying to become or meaning to be or even expanding that idea in a way that found itself without us trying too hard or meaning to be anything at all. i found a type of performance that i didn't have to think about i didn't have to try to experience or pretend but something i could exist very well in- very naturally in. that was something that before hand  had not been available to me- something that before hand i had not been able to feel comfortable with or in- finding instead more of a false representation of what i was trying to define… .


A draft of Part One of the final piece. 

THOUGHTS AND NOTES FROM THIS ROUGH SHOOT:

1. look at the moment after the slow arm fall when the flamingo leg happens..maybe it needs a little revamp- a little spontaneity. maybe it is a little sharper and faster?

2. monkey arm wall phrase- take out the four arbitrary moves to do moves- make it a bit schmaltzy and sexy perhaps? especially the leg drag in after the stark shape on the wall and the subtle shoulder dropping….right before that and right after that is sexy schmaltz.

3. the ancient artifact hunt becomes something more specific- while defining we keep to certain boundaries- we make a rhythm- we stay small and close- or something that is less random and spurting and looking like a using up of time and space…..why do we need it? just to create a negative for the other events? maybe it is a colliding duet? little tiny moments of physical push and pull- competing for balance- but not in a conflict kind of way- more of in a happenstance kind of way- happen to collide but not making it argumentative or competitive in any way. proximity becoming important. the edges. 

 4. stay DOWN. on the knee fall. for a sec. keep the stops. 

5. define for yourself what the arms are on the slow sideways walking- open up the angle a bit more- less sharp diagonal. are the arms doing something repetitive or changing constantly- some moments right now look interesting- others look forced compared to kathryns slow roll up and down the body- look at the original LCI improv. 

6. roll down together. get low.

7. could easily fold back into that corner wall and do a CYCLE of positioning…….?

8. spider web mapping- what is it? maybe we need a fast away from each other and a suspension at the furthest point- similar to the spider up the wall suspension moment. an acknowledgment of the limits- of the specific wall- and stopping point of the map. a forced return. 

9. at the end kathryn stops on knees and waits for me- or a series of stopping and waiting and moving at the same time- maybe this is a moment to develop a rhythm- a breathing cycle, a movement cycle- ending on the wall. at 12 minutes perhaps the music begins to become cyclical and slightly rhythmic. we begin our cycle of positions- using that to get to the wall.  

 

 

SHOW at Center for Performance Research, Brooklyn, 2012